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Donegal speaker on Faith and Politics: ‘Let’s not be jerks’

Donegal speaker on Faith and Politics: ‘Let’s not be jerks’

    Sep 27, 2020

    Presenter: Synod of the Trinity

    Subject: Presbytery of Donegal

    The author of a recently released book titled “Thou Shalt Not Be a Jerk: A Christian’s Guide to Engaging in Politics,” Eugene spoke on the topic of “Faith and Politics.” With a controversial election occurring in the United States on the horizon, he admitted that politics are important because politics influence people and “God cares about people.”

    “As Christians, we should never, never obsess about politics, but I do want to urge you that politics matter because politics inform policies that influence human people.”

    That was part of the message the Rev. Eugene Cho delivered during a recorded sermon that was presented during the Presbytery of Donegal’s online gathering in late September. The presbytery partnered with Paoli Presbyterian Church to host Eugene. The Paoli Church is sharing his message at its worship service on Sunday, Sept. 27. Eugene is the president and CEO of Bread for the World, a prominent non-partisan Christian advocacy organization urging both national and global decision-makers to help end hunger – both in the United States and around the world.

    The author of a recently released book titled Thou Shalt Not Be a Jerk: A Christian’s Guide to Engaging in Politics,” Eugene spoke on the topic of “Faith and Politics.” With a controversial election occurring in the United States on the horizon, he admitted that politics are important because politics influence people and “God cares about people.”

    “As we’re thinking about the kingdom of God, we have to remind ourselves that our theology should never be hijacked by politics,” he said. “Rather, our theology should be that which informs our politics and not the other way around.”

    Eugene, who appeared live online with the Presbytery of Donegal for an hour-long question-and-answer session following the playing of his recorded message, recalled that when he was younger that if you were a “good Christian,” your values lined up with the Republican party and that was how you were expected to vote. These days, he said living in Seattle, that same line of thinking is linked to the Democratic party.

     

    Click here to read the entire article on the Synod of the Trinity's website